Índice de  GALE HAROLD FORO
 
  GALE HAROLD FORO

Perfil
RegístreseF.A.Q.Índice de  GALE HAROLD FOROBuscar 
 Lista de MiembrosGrupos de UsuariosConectarse 

Randy Harrison
Ir a página Anterior  1, 2, 3 ... 122, 123, 124 ... 185, 186, 187  Siguiente
 
Publicar Nuevo Tema   Responder al Tema    Índice de GALE HAROLD FORO -> OTROS PERSONAJES Y ACTORES DE QUEER AS FOLK
Ver tema anterior :: Ver siguiente tema  
Autor Mensaje
bego
PROPIEDAD DE GALE.


Registrado: 17 May 2007
Mensajes: 1954

Reputación: 90.6Reputación: 90.6
Votos: 4

MensajePublicado: Mie Ago 18, 2010 2:05 pm    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

gracias por las fotos!!
la verdad es que yo le quitaba los tirantes, porque no, no me gsta, aunque bueno se lo dejaremso pasar por lo sonriente y feliz que parece, pero nada mas que por eso
Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado  
Google
AdSense






MensajePublicado: Mie Ago 18, 2010 2:05 pm    Título del mensaje: Enlaces Patrocinados



Volver arriba
Decatur
ADMINISTRADORA


Registrado: 26 Jun 2007
Mensajes: 3266

Reputación: 171.7Reputación: 171.7
Votos: 6

MensajePublicado: Mie Ago 18, 2010 5:17 pm    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

Reseña de la obra de Randy en dos publicaciones. Pero no hay imágenes ni nada y eso que se estrena mañana... Imagino que irán a verle y compartirán... supongo, porque últimamente la gente que sigue a Randy no está demasiado colaboradora... Rolling Eyes

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/17/AR2010081705463.html

http://www.metroweekly.com/spotlight/2010/08/shakespeare-theatres-free-for.html
_________________
"I´m totally optimistic...I´m totally pesimistic"

Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado  
Perfil1
SIN NEURONA YA..


Registrado: 21 Mar 2009
Mensajes: 998
Ubicación: España
Reputación: 78Reputación: 78

MensajePublicado: Mie Ago 18, 2010 9:04 pm    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

Pues a ver si colaboran y comparten que es un gesto muuuuuuuuuuuu cristiano Razz .
Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado  
Decatur
ADMINISTRADORA


Registrado: 26 Jun 2007
Mensajes: 3266

Reputación: 171.7Reputación: 171.7
Votos: 6

MensajePublicado: Jue Ago 19, 2010 6:27 am    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

Como regalito de despedida os dejo ésto Wink Cuidadín con el teclado... Aviso! jajajaja



Acompaña a esta entrevista

http://www.metroweekly.com/feature/?ak=5521

Life After Folk
If all you know of Randy Harrison is Queer as Folk, you don't know Randy Harrison
by Tom Avila
Published on August 18, 2010, 10:26pm | 0 Comments, 4 Tweets

''Could you tell me, like, where's a good place to go?'' -- Justin Taylor, Episode 1, Queer as Folk.

Many of us first saw Randy Harrison standing on the edge of Liberty Avenue, a cigarette tucked behind his ear and a look of nervous determination on his face. Against a blur of quick cuts and the background thump of Ruff Driverz ''Deeper Love,'' we watched as a very handsome, very young-looking guy tried as hard as he could not to look out of place.


When I meet Harrison, the real Randy Harrison, it's under much different circumstances. The blinking lights and choreographed bustle of Queer as Folk's very made-for-television gay neighborhood is nowhere to be found. We're in a rehearsal space in Shakespeare Theatre Company's 8th Street studios. The large empty room is, in fact, the opposite of bustling.

And, in a very similar fashion, Harrison bears little resemblance to Justin, the character he played for five seasons on the hit Showtime series.

Make no mistake -- he's just as good-looking as he was when he stepped off the curb in that first episode. The killer smile is firmly in place. But this room seems to better suit the actor and where he is now. A space that is normally all about the craft of acting, a place to work to find that sweet spot that satisfies the actor and thrills the audience. At least, that is, when interviewers aren't using it to talk about television shows that have long since faded from the airwaves.

Harrison is in town to play Sebastian in Shakespeare Theatre Company's remount of Twelfth Night. Like many of Shakespeare's comedies, Twelfth Night involves mistaken identities, characters not being who they are believed to be.

There's a certain irony to that as it quickly becomes clear that anyone confusing Harrison for Queer as Folk's Justin Taylor is quite mistaken.

METRO WEEKLY: Queer as Folk was your first television show?


RANDY HARRISON: My only television show.

MW: When the series started, did you guys know you were doing something that no one had seen before?

HARRISON: We knew nothing like it had been done on American television before.

MW: And you were doing theater all through the time you were doing Queer as Folk?

HARRISON: Yes, and before.

MW: What was it like doing TV and still doing theater? Was there one that you wanted to get through so you could do the other?

HARRISON: Yeah, I always wanted to get back to theater.

MW: So what was it then that moved you to do the audition for a television series?

HARRISON: I'll audition for anything if I respond to the material. I had finished school and I had just moved to New York. I was doing many more musicals than I was interested in doing and I knew that I needed to make a shift or I would get stuck. So I just got an appointment with an agent I was freelancing with and they put me on tape. I had two callbacks and I got it. And because it was so out of the blue – I had just gotten my equity card a few years beforehand – I wasn't nervous. It just seemed silly.

MW: Silly? Really?

HARRISON: Yeah, because it seemed so arbitrary. It was like, ''I'm auditioning for a TV show?'' Okay. Whatever. And when I was doing the audition, I was thinking about the callbacks because it meant I could go to Los Angeles. I had already been thinking of moving to L.A. because I thought the move would help me shift away from all the musicals I was doing. Maybe L.A. would be a better place for me.

I just thought of it as a free trip to L.A. I don't think the flight was first class... or was it? [Laughs.] But it was nice. It was a free hotel room. I mean I was doing small regional musicals. Being flown out to L.A. was not the kind of life I was accustomed to at all.

MW: And you were already out when you did the audition?

HARRISON: Oh, yeah. I've been out since I was 16.

MW: And you were how old when you started doing the show?

HARRISON: 22.

MW: Showtime added a disclaimer that read: ''Queer as Folk is a celebration of the lives and passions of a group of gay friends. It is not meant to reflect all of gay society.'' But was it ever weird? You were a young gay man playing a young gay man.

HARRISON: It was never weird because I had been out since I was a teenager. It was never weird to be out. What was weird was to be on television and be a little… not famous… but, you know, having people kind of know you. Even now people think I'm something I'm not because of that show.

I don't think it has anything to do with being out, though. I think that anybody on television that played one character for a long time goes through the same thing. It's weird to represent something that wasn't created by you and isn't you.


I'm sure that it's caused things, made it harder for certain people to see me other than a certain way, but I think it's also opened up opportunities for me.

I really try not to think about it too much. If I'm doing what I want to be doing I'm happy. But there are times when it's, ''Another script to do that? No. I'm not interested. No.'' You end up passing on a lot and fighting a little bit harder probably for things that are different.

But that was all a really long time ago. It was like 11 years ago that we started doing it and then we finished doing it five years ago. And I haven't thought of it since.

MW: Except when interviewers ask you about it. Is that frustrating?

HARRISON: Not really. It's to be expected.

MW: And there's still a fair number of websites that bounce back to you in your Queer as Folk days.

HARRISON: Are there?

MW: You don't know that? You don't Google yourself?

HARRISON: I don't. I do not search myself. I do not read anything written about me. I don't.

MW: Ever?

HARRISON: Sometimes, like a sound bite or something if someone forwards it to me. But I don't. I avoid it all.

MW: Do you read reviews?

HARRISON: No.

MW: Have you ever read reviews?

HARRISON: Yes, but I stopped because, amidst a bunch of good reviews, I got one review that made it almost impossible for me to continue performing the show. It was just something that hurt me. And I realized that there was no reason to it. The review was meaningless to me, or anyone surrounding the project, so why risk something that's going to make me unable to do what I've been hired to do?

MW: How did you manage to get past that? Because that's a pretty weighty moment to think, ''I don't know that I can do this anymore.''

HARRISON: I just kept on performing, but it was harder. The fact that a review was capable of becoming so distracting made me realize it's not worth ever risking it. And it just doesn't help.

You go through and you create a show with your fellow actors, with the writer if they are alive, with the director, collectively. And then when it's up, you're done. You're doing the work that you're doing.

I don't know. I think the need to read reviews is searching for something that is never going to be fulfilled. You love to know that what you're doing is working. You hear when everyone is saying a show is getting good reviews and you're happy. It's like, ''Oh good, I'm glad.'' We worked hard and we think it's good. But half the time you work really hard and you think it's great and everybody hates it. Or, you think it's not really working and everybody loves it. It's just completely arbitrary.

MW: When you were doing interviews for Queer as Folk, were people interested in talking to you about the theater work you were doing?

HARRISON: I don't really remember. I think that I would always mention it. You would get the question where they would want you to give a prophecy for the rest of your career. What are you going to do when this is finished?

I was just going to go back and keep doing theater. It's what I love. I talked about it, but people were always less interested in it than in television, for whatever reason.

MW: What brought you to theater? When did you start?

HARRISON: I started acting when I was like 8. I saw a play when I was really young and I was at that age where the magic of the theater just blew my mind. That can actually still happen to me.

But it was like the proscenium was there and on the other side was a completely different world where magical things could happen. Anything could happen. I wanted to be on the other side of the proscenium and be in that world.

MW: Do you remember what show that was?

HARRISON: Yes. Yes, I do. It's a little embarrassing. It was Peter Pan with Sandy Duncan. I was like 5 years old and she was touring in Peter Pan and I think she flew out over us in the audience. In my imagination, which is very vague, it felt like I could touch her, like she was flying right above me.

MW: My nephew, who's now about that age, just saw Mary Poppins on Broadway and had a very similar experience. Mary Poppins flew over them in the balcony and he kept trying to figure out where she went.

HARRISON: It's amazing.

MW: Every show should include someone flying out over the audience.

HARRISON: We're flying in Twelfth Night.

MW: So you had this kind of magical experience. Was there a moment when you were doing theater when you realized that this was it? This was what you were going to do?

HARRISON: No, it sort of accumulated. I started because I was in love with it and really wanted to do it. Ever since I was 8, I would do like two or three plays a year, working constantly. So, after a while it was like, ''I'm going to keep doing this.'' I think I knew when I was 12 or 13 that I was definitely going to keep acting professionally.

MW: You've done a nice range of stuff.

HARRISON: I think so. It's definitely starting to get there. It's been a fight to start doing everything that I wanted to do.

MW: Well, you're here to do Shakespeare and you've done Wicked. You've done Equus. That's a range right there.

HARRISON: I know, it is a range, right? I think one of my favorite things that I've done so far is when I did Waiting for Godot in the Berkshires. I think it was just a really, really good production. It was a wonderful director, and a wonderful company and people really responded to what we did. I love the play. I love Beckett. I think a lot of times Beckett can be kind of calcified in performance. People get too tied up in the idea of what it is and what it means, and it's hard for audiences to let go of their preconceptions of the way they're supposed to respond to it. People expect it to be more academic. I think something about this production – and I can't pinpoint what it was – but I think people were able to see it completely fresh and respond to it in a completely human way.

It's like what I said about not reading criticism. I didn't read the criticism of the show, but at the same time the audiences – half of which were, you know, my friends – were responding. You can tell when somebody really, really responds to something, that the play meant something to them and affected them in a way that they didn't expect.

And that's why you become an actor, when you see theater like that you're like, ''I hope I'm in a production that affects someone the way I was just affected.'' And I felt like Godot did that to a lot of people that I care about and respect, so that made me happy.

MW: Is this your first time doing theater in D.C.?

HARRISON: Yes. I'm happy to be in D.C. I've wanted to work here for a very long time. It's such a theater-friendly town. There's such a group of really talented actors that are based here or work here all the time. There are so many really accomplished theaters – that pay living wages. [Laughs.]

MW: Which is the secret that no one knows about D.C.

HARRISON: I know! I think the whole idea that New York is the center of American theater at this point is a complete fallacy. There's a lot all over the country and I think the competitiveness and the cost of theater in New York has really stifled it in such a way that the good stuff just doesn't happen there that often anymore.

MW: Where else have you been?

HARRISON: I've been in New York a lot. A bunch of off-Broadway. I did Wicked. I worked at the Guthrie in Minneapolis (as Tom Wingfield in the Glass Menagerie). I just worked at Yale Rep in New Haven (as Andy Warhol in the musical Pop!). I've worked with the Anne Bogart's SITI Company when they were in Alabama, which was a very interesting experience. And in the Berkshires.

MW: And you're also a Southern Yankee.

HARRISON: It's weird right?

MW: Because you grew up in Nashua, N.H., for part of your childhood –

HARRISON: – and then Atlanta. I feel like a Yankee ultimately. We left Nashua when I was 11, and then I grew up in Atlanta. But I never felt at home there. I went to school in Cincinnati and I felt less at home there. But since I've started working in the Berkshires and in western Massachusetts, I feel re-connected to the New England area. It's always felt like home to me. I still have some family there. My aunt is there. But now I think of it like a summer home, which is kind of nice.

MW: Did you do Berkshires already this year?

HARRISON: Yeah. I did Samuel Beckett's Endgame. I played Nagg. It was beautiful. Like I said, I love Beckett. I love his use of language. I love speaking it. I love seeing it.

MW: And what were you doing in Alabama?

HARRISON: I studied with Ann Bogart, I think while I was still doing Queer as Folk. SITI, which is her company, was in residency at the Actor's Theatre of Louisville when I was still in school in Cincinnati. I'd drive an hour and see some of the amazing work that they were doing. I was 19 or 20 and it really changed my head at the time.

So, I was studying with them and they were taking this production.... Actually, it's interesting. They were going to be remounting a production that already existed – just like I'm doing here. So, I've actually done a Shakespeare show at a really similar speed. In terms of style they're really different, but as far as the rehearsal process it was the same.

I wanted to do the production so I'd have gone wherever. It was fun, but it was strange to be in Alabama at this Shakespeare festival that was deciding what it wanted to be. I actually think that that festival is doing musicals now.

MW: Which is what you started out doing, right?

HARRISON: I went to school at University of Cincinnati's College–Conservatory of Music. I was a singer in high school as well as an actor.

The conservatory has an amazing musical-theater program but after four years of doing nothing but jazz hands, I was thinking, ''I want to do Shakespeare. I want to do Chekov. I want to do Beckett. If I keep doing musicals it's going to be way too far of a leap to get there.'' So I had to stop completely for a long time.

I like what I do now. I'll do a musical every three or four years. I miss singing after a while, so I'm always happy when the time comes and I'm like, ''I think I want to do a musical.'' And also, there are more jobs in musicals and they pay better. [Laughs.] So it's good when you want to do one.

I think I hadn't done a musical in seven years when I did Wicked. It was on Broadway and it was still the original cast, though they switched over when I was doing it. The guy I replaced actually had to leave – to go do Midsummer – so I just went in for five weeks. I think I started the week after Idina (Menzel) won the Tony.

MW: No pressure.

HARRISON: Right? And while I was in it Kristin (Chenoweth) left and Jennifer Laura Thompson came in. It was really interesting. Wicked is just such a huge spectacle and to be part of a show that big and that successful was fascinating. The hall we performed in was cavernous.

MW: And now you've landed in Brooklyn, where you're part of an artists' group?

HARRISON: The Artist Bureau. It's really a group of people I know and love who are artists in various capacities. It's sort of an umbrella and a way we can create things that we really want to do.

It's funny, there are times when it gets really intense, where I'm really involved in making specific things and then there are times when I'm away and nothing happens for a few months. It's arbitrary. They're actually doing a bunch of readings in L.A. right now and trying to produce a friend's play. I think that might be the next thing that happens, but I'm not sure.

MW: There are going to be people who are surprised how theater-centered you career has been. Is there something else that you've wanted people to know about you in terms of either this work or where you're headed next?

HARRISON: No. People have been asking me that recently. I'm going to say no. I never want to volunteer any more information then is already out there. [Laughs.]

MW: I know that a good deal of time has passed since you were doing the series, but I think it's fascinating how you've really been able to take a few steps back and done that thing that some actors aren't able to do. You've completely established an identity for yourself in the theater in such a way that it doesn't seem like people are going to see you thinking, ''I'm going to go see the guy from Queer as Folk do Shakespeare tonight.''

HARRISON: No. I think it's just luck. When I'm auditioning I don't feel very often that I'm considered any differently. Half the time people don't even know when they're casting me that I was in a television show. I don't know that some of them have even watched it. It was successful in its way, but it was very niche. It's not like I stepped on top of that success to do the work that I have been doing. The theater is like a whole separate thing. I've sort of started from scratch in theater.

I also think the kind of theater jobs that I could get from having been in Queer as Folk aren't the kind of theater jobs I'm interested in doing. I don't know what those would really actually be. I mean, Naked Boys Singing?

MW: That's where I was going to go with that.

HARRISON: I know.

Randy Harrison will be appearing in Shakespeare Theatre Company's Twelfth Night, part of Free for All. Aug. 19 to Sept. 5. Visit shakespearetheatre.org for full details.


Esta es la foto de la portada de la publicación




************************
_________________
"I´m totally optimistic...I´m totally pesimistic"

Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado  
bibiherz
SIN NEURONA YA..


Registrado: 30 Abr 2009
Mensajes: 781

Reputación: 74.9

MensajePublicado: Jue Ago 19, 2010 4:42 pm    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

Pos menos mal que has avisado con lo de las babas, porque madre del amor hermoso... como esta el muchacho *____*
Aqui esta claro que no tengo pegas ninguna de su imagen.
Porque esta waposo a rabiar Cool
Me encanta!

Y tb me ha gustado mucho la entrevista. Muy curiosas algunas de sus repuestas. Como lo de que no se googlea a si mismo.
Yo soy de pensar que si que lo hará, pero quizas cuando no este trabajando para no desmotivarse por si ve alguna critica no muy buena.

En fin, muchas gracias por el regalito de despedida. Que mejor dicho, es un REGALAZO. Embobaita sigo aún con las pics htttt
Gracias mil!

Besotesss:**********
_________________
"NO EXCUSES, NO APOLOGIES, NO REGRETS"

Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado   Visitar sitio web del autor
Perfil1
SIN NEURONA YA..


Registrado: 21 Mar 2009
Mensajes: 998
Ubicación: España
Reputación: 78Reputación: 78

MensajePublicado: Jue Ago 19, 2010 9:23 pm    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

Qué bien le quedan esas camisetas con lo bronceadito que está Very Happy .

Ya sabemos nosotras que sigue tan guapo como en QAF y con la misma sonrisa....aunque está bien que el periodista lo corrobore.

Y qué amor tan grande por el teatro siente éste chico xxxxxddddd.

Un poco pillín en cuanto a que no lee en Google cosas sobre sí mismo salvo que le hagan llegar algo. No sé, no sé, pero tengo para mi que no se entera de lo que no quiere, jajajaja.


Como siempre, Deca, estás en todo.
Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado  
Yessibolson
PROPIEDAD DE GALE.


Registrado: 11 Ene 2008
Mensajes: 1866
Ubicación: Ceutaaa
Reputación: 121.9
Votos: 3

MensajePublicado: Lun Ago 23, 2010 7:04 pm    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

Gracias a Carolruga y dobra, del LJ, os dejo la traducción de la entrevista a Randy. Disfrutadla Smile

La vida después de la Tribu

Si todo lo que conoces de Randy Harrison es Queer as Folk, no conoces a Randy Harrison


“Puedes decirme, como, un buen sitio para ir?” – Justin Taylor, Episodio 1, Queer as Folk


Muchos de nosotros vimos a Randy Harrison por primera vez plantado en los limites de Liberty Avenue, un cigarrillo colocado tras su oreja y una mirada de nerviosa determinación en su cara. Contra unos borrosos y rápidos fotogramas y el chumba-chumba del “Deeper Love” de Ruff Driverz de fondo, vimos como un chico muy atractivo y muy joven intentaba, como podía, no parecer fuera de lugar.

Cuando conozco a Harrison, el Randy Harrison real, es bajo unas circunstancias muy distintas. Las luces parpadeantes y el coreografiado bullicio del vecindario de QAF, tan creado para la televisión han desaparecido. Estamos en un espacio de ensayo en el “Shakespear Theatre Company’s 8th Street studios”. La gran sala vacía es, de hecho, lo opuesto al bullicio.

Y , de una forma muy similar, Harrison muestra un escaso parecido con Justin, el personaje que interpretó durante 5 años en el gran éxito de Showtime.

No nos equivoquemos – es tan guapo como lo era cuando pisó fuera de la acera en el primer episodio. Esa sonrisa matadora está firmemente en su sitio. Pero esta sala parece ajustarse mejor al actor y a su situación actual. Un espacio que es, normalmente, un hervidero de actuación, un lugar en el que trabajar para encontrar ese punto G que satisface al actor y conmueve a la audiencia. Al menos es así cuando los entrevistadores no lo utilizan para hablar sobre series de televisión que hace mucho abandonaron las ondas.

Harrison está en la ciudad para interpretar a Sebastian en la versión del Shakespear Theatre Company de Twelfth Night (“Noche de Reyes o lo que queráis”—es cómo se llama en Español). Como muchas comedias de Shakespeare, Twelfth Night incluye identidades equivocadas, personajes que no son lo que se cree que son.

Existe cierta ironía en ello ya que rápidamente queda clarísimo que, cualquiera que confunda a Harrison con el Justin de QAF está en un error.

METRO WEEKLY: ¿QAF fue tu primera serie de televisión?

RANDY HARRISON: Mi única serie de televisión

MW: cuando empezó la serie, ¿sabíais que estabais haciendo algo que nadie había visto antes?

RH: Sabíamos que no se había hecho antes en la televisión americana

MW: Y tu estuviste haciendo teatro al tiempo que estabas haciendo QAF?

RH: Sí, y antes

MW: ¿Cómo era hacer televisión y seguir haciendo teatro? ¿Había alguno (de los dos) con lo que quisieses terminar para después poder hacer lo otro?

RH: Si, siempre quise regresar al teatro

MW: Entonces, ¿qué fue lo que te empujó a hacer la audición para la serie?

RH: Me habría presentado a cualquier cosa si daba el tipo. Había acabado la Universidad y acababa de mudarme a Nueva York. Hacía más musicales de los que estaba interesado en hacer y sabía que necesitaba un giro o me quedaría encasillado. Así que me cité con un agente para el que trabajaba como autonomo y me grabaron. Recibí dos llamadas en respuesta y lo conseguí. Y como fue tan repentino – acababa de obtener mi carnet laboral hacía poco de antemano – no estaba nervioso. Parecía una estupidez.

MW: ¿Una estupidez? ¿De veras?

RH: Si, porque parecía tan arbitrario. Fue como “¿estoy haciendo audiciones para una serie de televisión?” Vale. Lo que sea. Y cuando estaba haciendo la audición, estaba pensando en las llamadas de respuesta porque significaban poder ir a Los Ángeles. Había estado pensando en mudarme a L.A. porque pensé que el traslado me ayudaría a alejarme de los musicales que estaba haciendo. L.A. podría ser un lugar mejor para mi.

Solo pensé en ello como un viaje gratis a L.A. No creo que el vuelo fuese en primera clase… ¿o lo fue? (risas) Pero fue bonito. El hotel era gratis. Quiero decir, estaba haciendo pequeños musicales regionales. Volar a L.A. no era la clase de vida a la que estaba acostumbrado, para nada.

MW: Y ¿habías salido del armario ya cuando hiciste la audición?

RH: Oh, si. Salí cuando tenía 16.

MW: Y ¿cuantos años tenías cuando empezaste a hacer la serie?

RH: 22.

MW: Showtime incluyó un descargo de responsabilidades que decía: “QAF es una celebración de las vidas y pasiones de un grupo de amigos gays. No pretende reflejar a toda la sociedad gay.” Pero ¿no era un poco extraño? Eras un joven gay interpretando a otro joven gay.

RH: Nunca fue raro porque había estado fuera del armario desde que era un adolescente. Nunca fue extraño estar fuera. Lo que era raro era aparecer en televisión y ser un poco… no famoso… pero, tú sabes, la gente como que te conoce. Incluso ahora hay gente que cree que soy algo que no soy a causa de la serie.

No creo que tuviese nada que ver con estar fuera, de todos modos. Creo que cualquiera en televisión que haya interpretado un personaje durante largo tiempo pasa por lo mismo. Es extraño representar algo que no ha sido creado por ti y que no eres tú.

Estoy seguro de que ha motivado cosas, hizo difícil para algunas personas verme de otra manera, pero también creo que me abrió muchas puertas.

Realmente intento no pensar demasiado en ello. Si estoy haciendo lo que quiero estar haciendo soy feliz. Pero a veces es como “¿Otro guión para hacer esto? No. No estoy interesado. No.” Al final terminas pasando de mucho y luchando más duramente por cosas que son diferentes.

Pero eso fue hace, realmente, mucho tiempo. Han pasado, como, 11 años que empezamos la serie y la terminamos hace cinco años. Y no he pensado en ello desde entonces.

MW: Excepto cuando los entrevistadores te preguntan sobre ello. ¿Es tan frustrante?

RH: Realmente no. Es previsible.

MW: Y sigue habiendo un montón de webs que se recrean en tus días en QAF

RH: ¿Ah sí?

MW: ¿No lo sabes? No te Googleas a ti mismo?

RH: No lo hago. No me busco a mi mismo. No leo nada escrito sobre mi. No lo hago.

MW: ¿Nunca?

RH: A veces, algún titular (se refiere a algo llamativo no a un titular literalmente) o algo si alguien me lo cuenta . Pero no lo hago. Lo evito del todo.

MW: ¿No lees criticas?

RH: No.

MW: ¿Has leído criticas en algún momento?

RH: Si, pero dejé de hacerlo porque, entre un montón de buenas criticas, tuve una que me hizo casi imposible continuar representando la obra. Fu algo que, simplemente, me hirió. Y me di cuenta de que no tenía sentido. La crítica no tenía significado para mi, o para nadie involucrado en el proyecto, así que ¿por qué arriesgarme por algo que puede hacerme imposible realizar el trabajo para el que he sido contratado?

MW: ¿Como te las arreglaste para superarlo? Porque es un momento crucial el pensar “Ya no sé si puedo seguir haciendo esto”

RH: Simplemente seguí interpretando, pero fue más difícil. El hecho de que una crítica fuese capaz de convertirse en algo que me distrajera tanto, me hizo darme cuenta de que no merece la pena ni siquiera arriesgarse. Y simplemente no ayuda.

Te metes en ello y creas un espectáculo con tus compañeros actores, con el autor si está vivo, con el director, colectivamente. Y entonces cuando está en marcha, has acabado. Estás haciendo el trabajo que estás haciendo.
No se. Creo que la necesidad de leer críticas es la necesidad de buscar algo que nunca va a satisfacerte. Adoras saber que lo que haces está funcionando. Escuchas cuando la gente dice que un show está teniendo buenas críticas y eres feliz. Es como “Oh, Dios, estoy encantado”. Trabajamos duro y creemos que es bueno. Pero la mitad del tiempo trabajas realmente duro y piensas que es genial y todo el mundo lo odia. O, tú crees que no está funcionando realmente y todo el mundo lo adora. Es completamente arbitrario.

MW: Cuando hacías entrevistas para QAF, ¿la gente estaba interesada en hablar contigo sobre los trabajos en teatro que estabas haciendo?

RH: Realmente no lo recuerdo. Creo que siempre lo mencioné. Te hacen la pregunta cuando quieren que hagas una profecía para el resto de tu carrera. ¿Qué vas a hacer cuando esto acabe?

Simplemente iba a regresar y seguir haciendo teatro. Es lo que amo. Hablé sobre ello, pero la gente siempre estaba menos interesada en ello que en la televisión, por la razón que fuese.

MW: ¿Qué te llevó al teatro? ¿Cuando empezaste?

RH: Empecé a actuar cuando tenía como 8 años. Vi una obra cuando era realmente joven y fue a esa edad cuando la magia del teatro simplemente estalló en mi mente. En realidad puede que me siga sucediendo todavía.

Pero fue como si el escenario estuviese allí y al otro lado hubiese un mundo completamente distinto en el que cosas mágicas podían suceder. Podía suceder cualquier cosa. Quería estar al otro lado del escenario y estar en ese mundo.

MW: ¿Recuerdas qué obra fue?

RH: Si. Si, lo recuerdo. Es algo embarazoso. Era “Peter Pan” con Sandy Duncan. Yo tenía como 5 años y ella estaba de gira con “Peter Pan” y creo que ella volaba sobre nosotros en la platea. En mi imaginación, que es algo confusa, sentí como que podía tocarla, como si ella estuviese volando justo sobre mi.

MW: Mi sobrino, que tiene más o menos esa edad, acaba de ver “Mary Poppins” en Broadway y tuvo una experiencia muy similar. “Mary Poppins” voló sobre ellos en la platea y el insistía en imaginar hacia donde había ido ella.

RH: Es asombroso.

MW: Todas la obras deberían incluir a alguien volando sobre el público

RH: Nosotros volamos en “Twelfth Night”

MW: Así que has tenido esa clase de experiencia mágica. ¿Ha habido algún momento en el que estuvieses haciendo teatro y te dieses cuenta de que era esto? ¿Qué era esto lo que ibas a hacer?

RH: No, se fue acumulando un poco. Empecé porque estaba enamorado de ello y realmente quería hacerlo. Desde que tenía 8, he hecho como dos o tres obras al año, trabajando constantemente. Entonces, después de un tiempo fue como “Voy a seguir haciendo esto”. Creo que lo supe cuando tenía 12 o 13, que definitivamente iba a seguir actuando de forma profesional.

MW: Has hecho una amplia gama de registros

RH: Yo también lo pienso. Definitivamente está empezando a llegar ahí. Ha sido una lucha empezar a hacer todo aquello que quería hacer.

MW: Bueno, estás aquí para hacer Shakespeare y has hecho “Wicked”. Has hecho “Equus”. Varios registros ahí mismo.

RH: Lo sé, eso es variedad, ¿no? Creo que una de mis cosas favoritas que he hecho, de lejos, es cuando hice “Esperando a Godot” en Berkshire. Creo que fue simplemente una producción muy, muy buena. Había un director maravilloso, y una compañía maravillosa y la gente realmente respondió a lo que hicimos. Adoro la obra. Adoro a Beckett. Pienso muchas veces que Beckett puede quedar recalcitrante en una obra. La gente se aferra a la idea de lo que es y lo que significa, y es difícil para la audiencia dejarse ir de sus ideas preconcebidas sobre la forma en la que se supone que deben responder a ello. La gente espera que sea más académico. Creo que había algo en esa producción – y no puedo decirte lo que fue – y la gente fue capaz de poder verlo de una forma totalmente fresca y responder a ello de una forma totalmente humana.

Es como lo que dije acerca de no leer las criticas. No leí las críticas sobre la obra, pero al mismo tiempo la audiencia – la mitad de los cuales eran, ya sabes, mis amigos – estaba respondiendo. Puedes notar cuando alguien responde de verdad ante algo, que la obra ha significado algo para ellos y les ha afectado de una manera que ellos no esperaban.
Y es por eso por lo que te conviertes en actor, cuando ves teatro como ese te dices “Espero estar en una producción que afecte a alguien de la forma en la que yo me he visto afectado” Y sentí como que “Godot” hizo eso en mucha gente que me importa y a la que respeto, así que eso me hizo feliz.

MW: ¿Es esta tu primera vez haciendo teatro en D.C.?

RH: Sí. Estoy contento de estar en D.C. He querido trabajar aquí desde hace tiempo. Es como una ciudad amiga del teatro. Hay un grupo de actores realmente talentosos que están establecidos aquí y trabajan aquí todo el tiempo. Hay tantos teatros realmente consolidados – que pagan sueldos jugosos (risas)

MW: ¿Cual es el secreto de que nadie conozca esto sobre D.C.?

RH: ¡Lo sé! Creo que toda esa idea de que Nueva York es el centro del teatro americano en este momento es una completa falacia. Hay mucho a lo largo de todo el país y creo que la competitividad y el coste del teatro en Nueva York lo ha ahogado realmente de una manera que el buen material simplemente ya no sucede allí tan a menudo.

MW: ¿Donde más has estado?

RH: He estado mucho en Nueva York. Un puñado de off-Broadway. Hice “Wicked”. He trabajado en el Guthrie en Minneapolis (como Tom Wingfield en “The Glass Menagerie”). Acabo de trabajar en Yale Rep en New Haven (como Andy Warhol en el musical “Pop!”). He trabajado con la Compañía SITI de Anne Bogart cuando estaban en Alabama, que fue una experiencia muy interesante. Y Berkshires.

MW: Y además eres un Yankee Sureño

RH: Es extraño ¿verdad?

MW: Porque creciste en Nashua, N.H., durante parte de tu infancia – y después Atlanta

RH: Me siento como un Yankee en el fondo. Dejamos Nashua cuando yo tenía 11, y entonces crecí en Atlanta. Pero nunca me sentí en mi hogar allí. Fui a la facultad en Cincinnati y me sentí aún menos en mi hogar allí. Pero desde que he empezado a trabajar en Berkshires y en el oeste de Massachusetts, me siento reconectado con el área de Nueva Inglaterra. Siempre me ha parecido mi hogar. Sigo teniendo algo de familia allí. Mi tía vive allí. Pero ahora pienso en ello como un hogar de verano, que es así como bonito.

MW: ¿Has hecho Berkshires este verano?

RH: Si. He hecho “Endgame” de Samuel Beckett. Interpretaba a Nagg. Fue precioso. Como he dicho, adoro a Beckett. Me encanta su uso del lenguaje. Me encanta hablarlo. Me encanta verlo.

MW: Y ¿qué estabas haciendo en Alabama?

RH: Estudié con Anne Bogart, creo que mientras estaba haciendo QAF. SITI, que es su compañía, estaba residiendo en el Actor’s Theatre de Louisville cuando yo aún estaba en la facultad en Cincinnati. Conducía una hora para ver algunos de los trabajos tan apasionantes que estaban haciendo. Tenía 19 o 20 y realmente cambió mi mente entonces.

Así que, yo estaba estudiando con ellos y ellos iban a iniciar esa producción… En realidad es interesante. Iban a re-escenificar una producción que ya existía – justo lo que estoy haciendo aquí. Así que, ya he hecho una obra de Shakespeare a una velocidad muy similar. En términos de estilo ellos son realmente diferentes, pero al final el proceso de ensayo fue el mismo. Quería hacer la producción así que tenía que ir donde fuese. Fue divertido, pero fue extraño estar en Alabama en ese festival de Shakespeare que estaba decidiendo lo que quería hacer. Creo que ahora ese festival hace musicales.

MW: Que es lo que tu empezaste haciendo, ¿correcto?

RH: Fui a la facultad en el Conservatorio de Música de la Universidad de Cincinnati. Era cantante en el instituto al tiempo que actor.

El Conservatorio tiene un programa de teatro musical estupendo pero tras 4 años haciendo nada más que “manos de Jazz” (estar bailando con los brazos extendidos y moviendo las palmas) pensaba “Quiero hacer Shakespeare. Quiero hacer Chekov. Quiero hacer Bekett. Si sigo haciendo musicales va a se muy difícil llegar a ello” Así que tuve que dejarlo totalmente durante un tiempo.

Me gusta lo que hago ahora. Haré un musical cada tres o cuatro años. Echo de menos cantar después de un tiempo, así siempre me pongo contento cuando llega el momento y estoy en plan “Creo que quiero hacer un musical”. Y además, hay más trabajos en los musicales y pagan mejor (risas). Así que es bueno cuando quieres hacer uno.

Creo que no había hecho ningún musical en siete años cuando hice “Wiked”. Era en Broadway y aún estaba el casting original, aunque cambiaron cuando yo lo estaba haciendo. El chico al que sustituí tuvo que irse – se fue a “Midsummer” – así que simplemente estuve allí cinco semanas. Creo que empecé la semana después de que Idina (Menzel) ganase el Tony.

MW: Sin presiones

RH: ¿A que si? Y mientras estaba en ello Kristin (Chenoweth) se fue y Jennifer Laura Thompson vino. Fue realmente interesante. “Wicked” es simplemente un espectáculo grandioso y ser parte de un show tan grande y tan exitoso fue fascinante. La sala en la que actuábamos era enorme.

MW: Y ahora has aterrizado en Brooklyn, donde formas parte de un grupo de artistas

RH: The Arts Bureau. Realmente es un grupo de gente que conozco y quiero y que son artistas en varias disciplinas. Es como una especie de paraguas y una forma de poder crear cosas que realmente queremos hacer.

Es divertido, a veces se convierte en algo realmente intenso, estoy realmente involucrado en hacer cosas específicas y luego hay momentos en los que estoy fuera y nada pasa durante unos cuantos meses. Es arbitrario. Están haciendo un puñado de lecturas en L.A. ahora mismo y tratando de producir la obra de un amigo. Creo que es la próxima cosa que va a suceder, pero no estoy seguro.

MW: Va a haber gente sorprendida de cuan centrada en el teatro ha estado tu carrera. ¿Hay algo más que hayas querido que la gente sepa sobre ti en relación con este trabajo o los que vendrán en el futuro?

RH: No. La gente me pregunta eso últimamente. Voy a decir que no. Nunca he querido facilitar más información que la que ya está ahí fuera. (risas)

MW: Se que ha pasado bastante tiempo desde que hiciste la serie, pero creo que es fascinante como has sido realmente capaz de dar unos cuantos pasos atrás y hacer eso que algunos actores no son capaces de hacer. Has establecido completamente una identidad por ti mismo en el teatro de una manera que no parece que la gente vaya a ir a verte pensando “Voy a ver al chico de QAF interpretar a Shakespeare hoy por la noche”

RH: No. Creo que es solo suerte. Cuando hago una audición no siento muy a menudo que soy considerado de forma diferente. La mitad de la gente ni siquiera saben cuando me están evaluando que estuve en una serie de televisión. Ni siquiera se si alguno de ellos la ha visto. Fue exitosa a su manera, pero tenia un publico muy especifico. No es como si hubiese salido de la cumbre de ese éxito para hacer el trabajo que he estado haciendo. El teatro es como una cosa totalmente diferente. He empezado como desde cero en el teatro.

Además creo que la clase de trabajos de teatro que podría obtener habiendo estado en QAF no son la clase de trabajos de teatro en los que estoy interesado. Ni siquiera se los qué serían. Quiero decir, ¿“chicos desnudos cantando”?

MW: Ahí quería llegar con la pregunta.

RH: Lo se.
_________________
Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado   MSN Messenger
Perfil1
SIN NEURONA YA..


Registrado: 21 Mar 2009
Mensajes: 998
Ubicación: España
Reputación: 78Reputación: 78

MensajePublicado: Lun Ago 23, 2010 9:40 pm    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

Dejando a un lado lo anecdótico como el que se busque o no sí mismo en la Red, jajajajaja, no sé si creerle porque navegar sí que parece que navega por ella, aunque eso no quiere decir que sea para interesarse por sí mismo Rolling Eyes, esta es una buena entrevista. Le sobra tanta pregunta sobre QAF, me parece que no venía al caso, pero alrededor de la mitad deja atrás la serie y creo que Randy se encuentra cómodo con el entrevistador y con ganas de seguirle. Las respuestas son inteligentes, le muestran seguro de sí mismo, con sólida formación profesional, sabiendo lo que quiere hacer con su carrera y el tipo de teatro que le gusta. Desde luego no el de Naked Boys Singing Razz .

Muy tierna la historia de Peter Pan.

Me gustaría saber qué crítica fue esa que afectó tan negativamente a Randy Crying or Very sad .

Un millón de gracias Yessi por colgarla, y también para Carolruga y Dobra por tomarse el trabajo de traducirla.
Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado  
Yessibolson
PROPIEDAD DE GALE.


Registrado: 11 Ene 2008
Mensajes: 1866
Ubicación: Ceutaaa
Reputación: 121.9
Votos: 3

MensajePublicado: Mar Ago 24, 2010 8:44 pm    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

sería interesante saber cual fue, la verdad.

aquí os dejo algunos enlaces con más info sobre Twelfth Night, extraídas del LJ de Kinwad. Thank you!


http://www.theatermania.com/washington-dc/reviews/08-2010/twelfth-night_29803.html


http://dctheatrescene.com/2010/08/22/twelfth-night-3/


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/23/AR2010082304407.html
_________________
Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado   MSN Messenger
Perfil1
SIN NEURONA YA..


Registrado: 21 Mar 2009
Mensajes: 998
Ubicación: España
Reputación: 78Reputación: 78

MensajePublicado: Mie Ago 25, 2010 7:41 pm    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

Ya tengo ganas de que sea el estremo. De nuevo veremos a Randy caracterizado, xxxxxxddddddd.


Un millón por los enlaces Very Happy .
Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado  
bibiherz
SIN NEURONA YA..


Registrado: 30 Abr 2009
Mensajes: 781

Reputación: 74.9

MensajePublicado: Jue Ago 26, 2010 5:10 pm    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

Pues sí, parece que vamos a volver a ver a Randy caracterizado.

Que ganas de que sea el estreno. Porque esto significara que puede que tengamos nuevas fotos y nuevas críticas de esta nueva obra y de su interpretación en ella.

Muchas gracias Yessi por colgar la traduccion de la entrevista y por los enlaces Smile
_________________
"NO EXCUSES, NO APOLOGIES, NO REGRETS"

Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado   Visitar sitio web del autor
Angi
PROPIEDAD DE GALE.


Registrado: 21 Abr 2008
Mensajes: 1638

Reputación: 87.3Reputación: 87.3
Votos: 1

MensajePublicado: Vie Ago 27, 2010 1:08 am    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

Cuántas cosas!!!

Bueno, las fotos con Peter, Sharon etc, me encantan. Además de que está guapisimo. En la de los tirantes, sin comentarios pero a él se lo perdonamos todo jeje

Deca, la foto que has puesto última es increible!! que guapisimo que está!!!

Y la entrevista me ha gustado mucho. Se le ve cómodo en ella, y me gusta que se extienda tanto en las respuestas. Aquí una vez más se nota lo inteligente que es Randy. Y también nos vuelve a dejar claro su gran amor por el teatro.

Ya con ganas de ver imágenes de su nueva obra y espero que le vaya genial. Bueno de eso estoy segura, es un GRAN actor.

A mi Perfil también me da mucha curiosidad saber que crítica fue la que le hizo tanto daño.

Muchisimas gracias Deca, Yessi, Dobra y Carolruga por la información, fotos, traducción y demás.
_________________
HE VISTO LA CARA A DIOS
SE LLAMA GALE HAROLD
Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado  
Decatur
ADMINISTRADORA


Registrado: 26 Jun 2007
Mensajes: 3266

Reputación: 171.7Reputación: 171.7
Votos: 6

MensajePublicado: Dom Ago 29, 2010 9:11 pm    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

Yo tb quiero agrdecer a las divinas CAROLRUGA Y DOBRA el regalo de la traducción y el detalle para con este foro. MUACKSSSSS NENAS!!! Wink

Mirad el layout que ha elegido la publicación "METRO WEEKLY" en su twitter. Imagino que durará hasta que lancen el nuevo número de la revista, pero está muy bien Very Happy

http://twitter.com/metroweekly

Y seguimos sin noticias de Washington... Toca esperar, a ver si se decide alguien a compartir sus impresiones Wink
_________________
"I´m totally optimistic...I´m totally pesimistic"

Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado  
Perfil1
SIN NEURONA YA..


Registrado: 21 Mar 2009
Mensajes: 998
Ubicación: España
Reputación: 78Reputación: 78

MensajePublicado: Lun Ago 30, 2010 8:35 pm    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

Se ve que la revista tiene gusto. El plano está muuuuyyyyyyy bien elegido.


Esperemos que haya pronto imágenes y, ya puestas a pedir, un vídeo.


Miles de gracias, Deca.
Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado  
Angi
PROPIEDAD DE GALE.


Registrado: 21 Abr 2008
Mensajes: 1638

Reputación: 87.3Reputación: 87.3
Votos: 1

MensajePublicado: Lun Ago 30, 2010 11:34 pm    Título del mensaje: Responder citando

Eso eso..que Gale os escuche!! imágenes y video..ya puestos a pedir..jaja...

Dios mioooo..la foto es impresionante!! está muy guapo. Muy chula la foto, si señor...

Gracias Deca!!
_________________
HE VISTO LA CARA A DIOS
SE LLAMA GALE HAROLD
Volver arriba
Ver perfil del usuario Enviar mensaje privado  
Mostrar mensajes anteriores:   
Publicar Nuevo Tema   Responder al Tema    Índice de GALE HAROLD FORO -> OTROS PERSONAJES Y ACTORES DE QUEER AS FOLK Todas las horas están en GMT
Ir a página Anterior  1, 2, 3 ... 122, 123, 124 ... 185, 186, 187  Siguiente
Página 123 de 187

 
Saltar a:  
No puede crear mensajes
No puede responder temas
No puede editar sus mensajes
No puede borrar sus mensajes
No puede votar en encuestas
Foro creado Gratuitamente en http://www.mundoforo.com
Crea gratis tu foro en http://www.mundoforo.com

Mapa del sitio



Powered by phpBB © 2001 phpBB Group
Template created by Stefan Paulus | phpbb2.de